• SDAOMA

    South Dakota Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine Association

  • Welcome!

    Thank you for your interest in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine in South Dakota.


    The SDAOMA is the association of Nationally Certified Acupuncturists in South Dakota.

     

    The purpose of SDAOMA is to increase awareness of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine, pursue licensure for acupuncturists, and to increase safe, cost effective health care options in South Dakota. If you would like to get involved please contact us.

     

    Members of the SDAOMA use acupuncture, herbal medicine, food energetics, tui na, as well as lifestyle recommendations to support the clients in reaching their individual health goals.

  • About Acupuncture

    Acupuncture is a complete medical protocol focused on correcting imbalances of energy in the body.

    Contrary to popular Western belief, acupuncture is not just a system for inserting very fine needles into specific body locations to alleviate pain. So, what is acupuncture, then? Acupuncture is a complete medical protocol focused on correcting imbalances of energy in the body. From its inception in China more than 2,500 years ago, acupuncture has been used traditionally to prevent, diagnose and treat disease, as well as to improve general health.

     

    The traditional explanation for acupuncture’s effectiveness is that it modifies the flow of energy (known as qi or chi) throughout the body, but there is no scientific consensus that this is actually its mechanism of action. Research published in the May 30, 2010 online edition of Nature Neuroscience demonstrated that the effects of acupuncture needling include influencing the activity of adenosine, an amino acid which becomes active in the skin after an injury to ease pain. This may explain in part why pain relief is often experienced as one of the benefits of acupuncture. In fact, much research in the West has focused on this pain-relieving effect, rather than acupuncture’s traditional role of balancing energy to address a wide range of disorders, and the more subtle mechanisms that may be responsible for its overall benefits to health.

     

    Acupuncture was popularized in the States during the early 70’s after President Nixon opened relations with China. At the time, a New York Times reporter, James Reston, had an appendectomy in a Chinese hospital using acupuncture as a means to decrease his post-surgical pain.

     

    What does acupuncture treat?

    Acupuncture is increasingly recognized by Western medicine as an effective alternative or adjunct to conventional treatments for stroke rehabilitation, headache, menstrual cramps, joint conditions, low back pain, and asthma as well as for the side effects of chemotherapy and nausea related to pregnancy. Acupuncture is often recommended for other pain-related conditions, especially osteoarthritis. Acupuncture to alleviate acute sinusitis can be quite effective, as can acupuncture on the ear for quelling addictions. Acupuncture can work well for addressing autoimmune conditions and infertility. Because acupuncture has so many positive effects on the body with minimal incidence of side effects, it is often considered in creating an integrative medicine treatment plan.

     

    Modern research and international health organizations agree that acupuncture is a safe and highly effective treatment for many conditions including:

    • Digestive Difficulties: such as food allergies, peptic ulcers, chronic diarrhea, constipation, indigestion, gastrointestinal weakness, anorexia, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and gastritis.
    • Bladder Disorders: including incontinence, urinary tract infections, and prostatitis.
    • Reproductive Issues: such as irregular, heavy or painful menstruation, premenstrual syndrome, infertility in women and men, menopausal symptoms and sexual dysfunctions.
    • Pain: such as arthritis, migraine headaches, neuralgia, dizziness, and low back, neck, dental and shoulder pain.
    • Circulatory Problems: such as hypertension, angina pectoris, arteriosclerosis and anemia.
    • Emotional Issues: including depression, insomnia and anxiety.
    • Addictions: such as alcohol, nicotine and drugs.
    • Supportive Therapy: reduces nausea, vomiting, post-operative pain, and the side effects of chemotherapy.
    • Breathing Problems: such as colds and flu as well as chronic respiratory conditions - emphysema, sinusitis, asthma, allergies and bronchitis.

    Are there any acupuncture side effects or indications where acupuncture should be avoided?

    When performed by a qualified professional, acupuncture is one of the safest medical procedures in the world.

     

    Those with bleeding disorders or who are taking blood thinners should check with their doctors before having acupuncture. The most common acupuncture side effects are bleeding and bruising at the site, along with minor pain and soreness. It is recommended that a disinfectant such as alcohol be swabbed over the area prior to needle insertion to decrease the very small possibility of infection. Obviously, needles should be clean and never shared between clients. Rarely, a needle may break. The worst case scenario is a punctured organ.

     

    However, serious complications are extremely rare when acupuncture is performed by a qualified, certified practitioner. A review of the international research literature revealed pneumothorax (a punctured lung) to be the only life-threatening complication to have occurred among tens of thousands of patients over nine separate trials. No post-acupuncture infections were reported in any of the studies.

    Does acupuncture hurt?

    Acupuncture uses very fine needles approximately the size of a human hair to engage the meridians. As they are gently manipulated, patients typically feel a dull ache, tingling or heaviness in the area or along the meridian. These sensations are attributed to the arrival of Qi and signal the beginning of the healing process. Although each individual will experience acupuncture differently, common responses are a feeling of renewed energy and deep relaxation.

    Is there a governing body that oversees or credentials practitioners of acupuncture?

     

     

    The practice of granting credentials to acupuncturists is in transition. Although most states require a license to practice acupuncture, the standards vary from state to state. If the practitioner is not a physician, most states require completion of an exam conducted by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). There is sharp division between medical doctors who use acupuncture, and non-M.D.’s who claim to be better trained in the philosophy and techniques of Oriental medicine. For more information about professional standards and licensing requirements for acupuncturists, contact the American Association of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine at 1-866-455-7999 or www.aaaom.org.

     

    A licensed acupuncturist (L.Ac.) holds a license in one or more states, whereas a person certified by the NCCAOM is called a diplomate of acupuncture (Dipl.Ac.). An oriental medicine doctor (O.M.D.) has obtained advanced training in acupuncture at a recognized school of oriental medicine, which generally requires a minimum of an associate’s degree for admission and offer a three to four year program. These schools are accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (ACAOM).

     

    Each state independently regulates acupuncture licensure. Medical doctors are also legally eligible to perform acupuncture provided they have gone through the adequate training involving 200-300 hours of self-study, have practiced acupuncture for at least 2 years, passed a board examination, and performed at least 500 treatments.

     

    The current professional and licensing organization for M.D.’s who practice acupuncture is the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture in El Segundo, California, www.medicalacupuncture.org.

     

    Sadly, there are other standards for those calling themselves "Acupuncturists" or utilizing forms of "Acupuncture" here in South Dakota:

    • Chiropractors (D.C.s)- need only 100 hours of training, review 25 case histories and no examination to legally perform "acupuncture" in South Dakota.

    • Medical Doctors (M.D.s) and Doctors of Osteopathy (D.O.s) have no minimum training requirements to do "acupuncture" in this state. They call themselves "Medical Acupuncturist

    Ask your Acupuncturist if he or she is NCCAOM certified (Dipl.Ac. or Dipl. O.M.) to insure that you are receiving care from a well-qualified Acupuncturist.

  • SDAOMA - South Dakota Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Association Leadership

    Association Leadership

    Colleen Ragan, L.Ac, MAcOM, Dipl. Ac

    SDAOMA President

    New Freedom Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine

    2040 W Main St. suite B-6

    Rapid City, SD 57702

    (605) 791-1838

    www.newfreedomacupuncture.com

    Drea Miller, L.Ac, MAcOM, Dipl. OM

    SDAOMA Vice President/Secretary

    Big Sun Acupuncture

    2050 W. Main St #8

    Rapid City, SD 57702

    (605) 389-1639

    www.bigsunacupuncture.com

     

    Annie Loyd, LMT

    SDAOMA Treasurer

    Big Sun Acupuncture

    2050 W. Main St #8

    Rapid City, SD 57702

    (605) 389-1639

     

  • Purpose of SDAOMA

    The purposes of the Association are:

     

        • To create a meeting place for South Dakota acupuncturists;
        • To share knowledge, ideas, and concerns about acupuncture, Oriental medicine, and related therapies with each other;
        • To educate the general public about acupuncture and Oriental medicine;
        • To actively promote and support positive legislation regarding acupuncture and Oriental medicine;
        • To support and encourage National goals congruent with the South Dakota Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Association goals;
        • To support and encourage the maintenance of the National Commission for the Certification of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM);
        • To support and encourage the organization's members to earn certification from the NCCAOM; and,
        • To support and encourage continuing education of acupuncturists.
  • Nationally Certified Acupuncturists in South Dakota

     

    Colleen Ragan, L.Ac, MAcOM, Dipl. Ac

    New Freedom Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine

    10. Saint Francis Street Rapid City, SD 57702

    (605) 791-1838

    www.newfreedomacupuncture.com

     

     

    Drea Miller, L.Ac, MAcOM, Dipl. OM

    Big Sun Acupuncture

    2050 W. Main St #8 Rapid City, SD 57702

    (605) 389-1639

    www.bigsunacupuncture.com


     

    Kathryn Halstead, L.Ac, MAcOM, Dipl. OM

    Acupuncture 4 Health

    402 E. Fairmont Blvd #C Rapid City, SD 57701

    (605) 721-4580

    www.acupuncture4health.com

     


    Nicole Krueger, L.Ac MTCM, Dipl. OM

    Thrive Acupuncture & Wellness

    809 South St. #311 Rapid City, SD 57701

    (605) 858-9571

    www.thriveblackhills.com

     

     

    Alan Suhr, L.Ac MTCM, Dipl. OM

    Thrive Acupuncture & Wellness

    809 South St. #311 Rapid City, SD 57701

    (605) 858-9571

    www.thriveblackhills.com
     

     

    Chris Ormseth, L.Ac MTCM, Dipl. OM

    Ormseth Acupuncture

    722 Main St. #5 Spearfish, SD 57783

    (605) 641-2028

    cormseth@hotmail.com



    Dylan Brandenburg
    Acupuncture of the Black Hills
    114 N. Main St. Spearfish, SD 57783

    (605) 644-6141

    acupunctureoftheblackhills@gmail.com


    Yeshan Hu
    Evidence Based OM
    5132 South Cliff Ave. #3Sioux Falls, SD 57708

    (605) 691-9957

    yueshan.hu@ebomus.com


    Shwurong Lee
    Chinese Acupuncture & Herb
    6110 S. Lyncrest Ave #102

    Sioux Falls, SD 57706

    (605) 691-4279



    Carol Ragle
    820 W. 3rd Ave. Mitchell, SD 57301

    (605) 292-3245

    dr.caragle@gmail.com


    Alexandra Rose
    Four Winds Acupuncture
    401 E. 8th St. #207 Sioux Falls, SD 57103

    (605) 212-7240

    indialyx@yahoo.com


    Randy Smith
    Finding the Balance
    3212 S. Phillips Ave. Sioux Falls, SD 57105

    (605) 254-7058

    ftbalance@gmail.com


    William Smith
    Smith Acupuncture Center
    PO Box 94 Aberdeen, SD 57403

    (605) 725-2223

    drsmith@smithacupuncture.com


    Yanchun Xu
    Evidence Based OM
    5132 South Cliff Ave. #3 Sioux Falls, SD 57103

    (605) 691-9957

  • Join / Support SDAOMA

    Support Licensure of Acupuncturist in South Dakota!

     

    Thank you for your interest in bringing qualified Acupuncturist to South Dakota. You can make the difference! The SDAOMA needs enthusiastic and energetic individuals who believe strongly in their right to access all that Acupuncturists have to offer.

    You Can Make A Difference by:

    1. Staying informed: Past and Current information on legislative activity 
    2. Telling your friends and family.
    3. Help spread the word to other healthcare consumers.
    4. Making a contribution
      Your financial support will help fund the costly process of monitoring and maintaining legislation pertinent to License Acupuncturists.
    5. Contacting your state legislators
      Find out how to meet with your state legislator and take action
    6. Supporting our Corporate Sponsors
    7. Becoming a member of the SDAOMA as a friend and supporter 

     

     

    Professional Membership

      

    Criteria: Nationally Certified Acupuncturists, dues paid; approved by Board of Directors.

     

         Benefits: Eligible for all benefits (voting rights, website listing and referrals)

     

         Fees (annual rate): $120

    Please make checks out to SDAOMA, and send checks to 2050 West Main Street, #8, Rapid City, SD 57701 along with a completed SDAOMA Application.


    Membership_Application.pdf
    234.4 KB

     

     

     Supporting Membership

     

        Criteria: Any person who is supportive of the mission of the SDAOMA; dues paid in full

        Benefits: Non-voting,

        Fees (annual): $50

     

    Student Membership

        Criteria: Any matriculating student in a recognized and accredited acupuncture school; dues paid in full

        Benefits: Non-voting

        Fees (annual): $50 one time during education

     

    Corporate/Organization Sponsorship

     

        Criteria: Any Corporation or Organization who is supportive of the mission of the SDAOMA;

     

     

    Benefits: Non-voting

    Fees: Please send an email

     

     

     

    Membership_Application.pdf
    234.4 KB

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  • Make a Contribution Now.

    Your financial support will help fund the costly process of monitoring and maintaining legislation pertinent to License Acupuncturists.